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I want to ask a legal question for the states of California and Massachusetts in the USA. Shall I post one or two questions?

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This is a special case of How do we handle localization of questions/answers?

The question seems at present to be unresolved on meta, although in practice it seems to be working quite well to post a single question. Specify any jurisdictions you're specifically interested in, and upvote the answers you find useful.

The opposite approach (posting separate copies of the question for each jurisdiction) will, in the limit, produce a mess. E.g., every question about state law in the U.S. could have fifty instances, all identical but for their jurisdiction tag. SE isn't equipped to deal with geographic tag hierarchies in any way that could helpfully organize such an approach.

  • That SE is not set up to handle the tags that way currently should not limit the way we operate unless that is the directive of SE. So far it appears SE is in agreement with the use of localized tags. – Chad Jun 5 '15 at 14:22
  • I was making a functional observation, not a policy observation. Functionally we are limited to five tags per question. Tags also have no hierarchy. So, for example, we have no way of specifying that "California" is a jurisidiction, and that it is a member of "Ninth Circuit," "Blue States," and "United States." – feetwet Jun 5 '15 at 19:19
  • There was some discussion earlier of adding some functionality like that – Chad Jun 8 '15 at 19:38
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If a question is asked about X and gets an answer scoped to address it for jurisdiction A then when someone wants to know about X for jurisdiction B when they ask their question it can be "X in B". At that point the first question could be edited to "X in A" or left as "X".

Eventually this will could result in:

  • "X"
  • "X in B"
  • "X in C"
  • "X in D"
  • "X in E"

but it will avoid "X" gathering answers that cross jurisdictional lines and may be in direct conflict. This could end up turning "X" into a community wiki instead of a clear question and answer.

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